Author Topic: welding question  (Read 406 times)

Offline darkside

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welding question
« on: August 22, 2018 - 02:12:22 pm »
Can a flux  125 welder be  used for welding floor pans and body panels?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2018 - 11:39:01 am by darkside »




Offline 70chall440

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Re: welding question
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2018 - 09:25:19 pm »
it can, however you should clean the welds afterward bc the flux that is on them won't take paint very well. People were building cars with flux coated sticks and arc welders for many years and were successful at it. Going to uncoated wire and gas makes for a better finished product, however it isnt mandatory.
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Offline GoodysGotaCuda

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Re: welding question
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2018 - 10:33:27 pm »
I personally wouldn't use flux. Lot's of slag and it tends to want to burn hotter, which may not be what you want for body panels.

Would it work? Yes
Would I prefer to use that type? No
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Offline darkside

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Re: welding question
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2018 - 10:47:12 am »
I personally wouldn't use flux. Lot's of slag and it tends to want to burn hotter, which may not be what you want for body panels.

Would it work? Yes
Would I prefer to use that type? No

Would it be ok just to use on floor pans  not outer body panels?

Offline GoodysGotaCuda

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Re: welding question
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2018 - 10:56:30 am »
Would it be ok just to use on floor pans  not outer body panels?

Yep


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Offline Cudakiller70

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Re: welding question
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2018 - 07:15:51 pm »
You may already know this, but just incase when switching from solid wire to flux core wire you usually have to change polarity. If polarity is not correct its a lot easier to burn through and you will have tons of spatter. For thinner gauges use the smallest diameter wire (.025) you can.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018 - 07:23:07 pm by Cudakiller70 »
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Offline 70chall440

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Re: welding question
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2018 - 11:39:22 pm »
Most welders have an information sticker inside where the wire goes that tells you what to do. I personally run .023 with gas for panel work. When I did my challenger I had a Harbor Freight (Campbell) 110 MIG. It did pretty much everything but I really had a problem with burning through a lot; when I was at my local welding supply place the told me that my gas regulator could be an issue, I bought a new one from him and it was like welding with a completely different machine.
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)

Offline darkside

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Re: welding question
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2018 - 10:09:01 am »
harbor freight has the flux 125 on sale this weekend for $84.99 with coupon.

Offline 70chall440

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Re: welding question
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2018 - 11:50:28 am »
Buy er up  :bigsmile: I will say this, get a machine that can take gas if you want (I have seen MIG welders that would only take flux coated wire without any provision to connect gas and go to solid wire).
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)

Offline darkside

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Re: welding question
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2018 - 11:00:37 am »
Got the welder and on 30 wire and low setting you cant weld a straight line on thin metal because it will burn through  sheet metal  but it will spot weld  back and forth ok on floor pans .

Offline 70chall440

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Re: welding question
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2018 - 11:22:25 am »
Very seldom can you weld a continuous bead on sheet metal because you found out it burns through. You can mitigate some of this if you put something on the back side like a copper plate (HF has them in the welding section). They draw some of the heat away. That said, spot welding or small beads are the way to go; should not be more than 1" long and they are done by doing a series of spot welds on top (make one spot weld, move the gun over 1/2 of the spot weld you just did and spot weld again. You are effectively stacking the welds, however you should only do about 3 or 4 of them in one location or the base metal will get too hot and eventually melt away. If you burn through, weld somewhere else and let it cool, once cooled off, go back and make very small spot welds around the hole you made which builds up the edges. Weld around the hole until you close it off.

As mentioned, weld one spot, then move to the opposite side and weld, then move to a new place. The idea is to keep the metal cool. As you work around the panel, eventually you will get to a point where you are connecting them. Once done, you will probably want to knock them down, use a flap wheel for this not a grinding wheel. I use 40 grit; while this is aggressive it does the job quickly and leaves a nice finish; DO NOT OVER GRIND the panel or you just make it thin and then welding will be very difficult if not impossible.

Its all about learning the trigger and how long it takes to get good penetration without burning through. You will get the feel of it over time.
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)

Offline darkside

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Re: welding question
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2018 - 06:06:42 pm »
Very seldom can you weld a continuous bead on sheet metal because you found out it burns through. You can mitigate some of this if you put something on the back side like a copper plate (HF has them in the welding section). They draw some of the heat away. That said, spot welding or small beads are the way to go; should not be more than 1" long and they are done by doing a series of spot welds on top (make one spot weld, move the gun over 1/2 of the spot weld you just did and spot weld again. You are effectively stacking the welds, however you should only do about 3 or 4 of them in one location or the base metal will get too hot and eventually melt away. If you burn through, weld somewhere else and let it cool, once cooled off, go back and make very small spot welds around the hole you made which builds up the edges. Weld around the hole until you close it off.

As mentioned, weld one spot, then move to the opposite side and weld, then move to a new place. The idea is to keep the metal cool. As you work around the panel, eventually you will get to a point where you are connecting them. Once done, you will probably want to knock them down, use a flap wheel for this not a grinding wheel. I use 40 grit; while this is aggressive it does the job quickly and leaves a nice finish; DO NOT OVER GRIND the panel or you just make it thin and then welding will be very difficult if not impossible.

Its all about learning the trigger and how long it takes to get good penetration without burning through. You will get the feel of it over time.

thanks for the info.

Offline 70chall440

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Re: welding question
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2018 - 12:32:45 am »
welcome
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)