Author Topic: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW  (Read 525 times)

Offline Focal7

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WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« on: August 22, 2018 - 01:47:01 pm »
First of all NO pictures of this car stuffed away in a garage and piled & piled with stuff. Not conducive to pictures at this point. Sorry. As for me, I have owned several high end mopars but have been away from the hobby and this board for almost 10 years. Stumbled on this car and Im drooling again. As I said been away for a while and have lost touch with values. Now for the car. 1970 V code Barracuda. Plum crazy purple, shaker hood car. Automatic, fender tag is lost, build sheet present. Original dash is in car with VIN tag. Rest is matching numbers. Car is complete with the exception of these important parts, shaker hood & mechanism, 6 pack intake, carbs, & air cleaner. Rear 1/4s have been replaced as has trunk pan. 1 pc floor is included but hasnt been switched yet. New interior is included but not installed. Some rust repair work to finish to include doors and front inner fender panels. Car is a big project. Current owner has had for 30 years. Clear title. Any guesses as to WIW???  Thanks!




Offline 70chall440

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Re: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2018 - 09:34:31 pm »
Not to sound flippant but its worth what you are willing to pay. That said, if you are going to do a full resto know that the cost of that can be $50 - $100K (or more depending on your requirements). Additionally, you need to look at the market for what car in the condition you ultimately want this one to be in when done is going for. With these 2 figures you should be able to then determine what you should be paying now.

Currently, very nice V code E bodies are selling for probably $70 - $150K, so if you are willing to spend say $50K to restore it, then you shouldn't pay more than say $20 - $40K to try and stay in the black. This is all out of my head, someone who really follows the market can give you much more accurate numbers. All this is assuming you don't have an emotional tie to that car or that style of car, if you do then the numbers don't matter. Personally, I'd rather have a very nice restomod with a Gen III hemi in it, but each to his own.
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)

Offline challengermaniac

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Re: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2018 - 11:32:12 pm »
Right.  As noted, depends on what side of the rebuild you are on.  It's one thing to go numbers matching, although you have to consider just how well that setup will work on todays highways if you intend on driving that classic.  The outdated drivetrains and suspensions may have you wanting more, especially at the higher freeway speeds.  That is why the RestoMods have come into favor with a lot of guys given they want modern day performance and handling and even better gas mileage.  Of course that usually means pulling the old components, so you don't want to pay for something you are not really going to use (original running gear and suspension).

Just goes to prove you can never take the Mopar out of someone!

Best.........
Charlie
70 Challenger 340/4 Purple
70 Challenger T/A Red
Edmonds, WA

Offline 70chall440

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Re: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2018 - 12:27:38 am »
alot has been written on the subject on here, some if by me  :bigsmile: its the push pull or draw of a potential investment opportunity wherein you can buy a car at a reasonable price, restore it, enjoy it for awhile and then make some money on it when the time comes. the problem in this formula is the market which of course ebbs and flows. In other words it comes down to having the right car for sale at the right time. Unfortunately as of late, these cars have not been selling for the kind of money only a few years ago they were. A large part of this is that the market moves with new trends coming and going and it appears that many of the "collectors" have been selling off their cars and moving onto other things. That said, true enthusiasts continue to pay decent money for well built restomods because they can actually enjoy them. Imagine stomping a new SRT with a vintage looking E body, being able to actually take corners at high speed, stop in a reasonable time, etc.

I dont have anything against restored cars, but I sincerely believe the up and coming investors are buying cars with modern drive trains partly because they are traditionally less price (but are catching up) and more importantly because they can be driven an driven hard. Another issue is the cost of restorations, it continues to rise because the quality of the restorations has gotten better along with the cost of quality components has gotten extremely expensive.

Of course it comes down to your car, your money.
Current Mopar
70 Challenger RT 440-6, 73 Cuda (under const)
05 Durango, 99 Dakota, 01 Ram 4x4, 14 2500 4X4, 10 PCP Challenger RT, 01 Viper GTS ACR, 52 B3B w/330 Desoto Hemi, 70 Hemi RR, 61 Jeep FC170
Past Mopars
9 x Challengers. AAR Cuda, 4 RR, 2 GTX, 4 Chargers, etc... (too many to list)

Offline focal 7

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Re: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2018 - 08:59:17 am »
I appreciate the above responses and as a purist I just assumed the only way to restore the above car was as it came from the factory. I was looking for the current fair market value of this car restored and a second value of the car as it sits in its rusty un-restored state. That would help me determine if its a good deal or not. If restomods are the current hot thing I understand but you can build that out of a base 318 model. When I was into mopars (2000-2010) a v-code car sold for 100-120k restored and you were fortunate to find the bones for 15-20k. Im sure values have come down. While I understand that restoration costs are higher than they have ever been that is not my main concern. I certainly dont want to be upside down in one either so maybe this project isnt for me. Using the above ratio from the past I was hoping the car would be worth 80k restored and maybe 10k would be considered a good price for the rusty project as it sits. Thank you gentlemen for your opinion and I understand if restomods are the current rage and the way to go, just dont think that is the way I would go. Call me old fashioned.

Offline challengermaniac

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Re: WIW 70 Plum, Shaker, Auto, Cuba WIW
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2018 - 10:50:04 am »
I appreciate the above responses and as a purist I just assumed the only way to restore the above car was as it came from the factory. I was looking for the current fair market value of this car restored and a second value of the car as it sits in its rusty un-restored state. That would help me determine if its a good deal or not. If restomods are the current hot thing I understand but you can build that out of a base 318 model. When I was into mopars (2000-2010) a v-code car sold for 100-120k restored and you were fortunate to find the bones for 15-20k. Im sure values have come down. While I understand that restoration costs are higher than they have ever been that is not my main concern. I certainly dont want to be upside down in one either so maybe this project isnt for me. Using the above ratio from the past I was hoping the car would be worth 80k restored and maybe 10k would be considered a good price for the rusty project as it sits. Thank you gentlemen for your opinion and I understand if restomods are the current rage and the way to go, just dont think that is the way I would go. Call me old fashioned.

The beauty here is that you have the option and ability to restore/build it your way to the desired outcome (Stock or RestoMod).  In all honesty, I would say a very high percentage of collector guys are backward in the amount invested in their cars versus the market values.  And that's okay given it was bought and built for their joy as a hobby in this short life.  So, if originality is what you desire, then pencil in the acquisition cost along with a parts price list, an estimate for outside labor plus another 10% for the unknowns and that will be what you have into the car.  Whatever it will be worth will be determined when and if it is ever for sale. 
« Last Edit: August 24, 2018 - 10:53:01 am by challengermaniac »
Charlie
70 Challenger 340/4 Purple
70 Challenger T/A Red
Edmonds, WA