Author Topic: Welding fumes  (Read 634 times)

Offline soundcontrol

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Welding fumes
« on: November 12, 2016 - 03:48:49 pm »
Now when I started welding a lot again, I notice that I breathe in the fumes a lot, I smell like smoke when I get home and my snot is black, this can not be good. Have to make some kind of exhaust system in the garage, I looked at the pro gear, too expensive for me. Have anyone made a good system cheap? Will a kitchen fan work? How powerful of a fan is needed if I hook it up to a 4" flextube, about 20 ft lenght, then out thru the wall? I probably need a pretty powerful fan to use that lenght of tube if its gonna suck up the smoke well. Does the fan work best at the front of the tube (where I weld) or at the end of the tube. In other words, whats better, to push or suck the air.
/ Ken
Restoration thread: http://www.cuda-challenger.com/cc/index.php?topic=102525.0
topic=108917.new#new




Offline AARTA340

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2016 - 03:57:10 pm »
Not sure which welding process you are using, mig is very susceptible to any air movement, so a large fan would not be good. I was doing some mig welding and the slight breeze from my shops overhead fan created enough air movement to cause some issues. Arc welding is quite forgiving, but probably not what you are welding. It will be interesting to see what others have to say, as I am interested in the issue as well.  :popcorn:

Offline soundcontrol

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2016 - 04:13:28 pm »
I use a TIG, so its sensitive also, but I dont think a fan set up the way I'm thinking is gonna create an airmovement at the welding point. Its gonna suck up the rising fumes. See picture, this is a proffessional welding shop. I was thinking I could duplicate this, redneck style :)
Cheap fan and some flex tubing.


/ Ken
Restoration thread: http://www.cuda-challenger.com/cc/index.php?topic=102525.0
topic=108917.new#new


Offline GoodysGotaCuda

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2016 - 05:11:36 pm »
Are you doing any grinding as well? I never found welding to give me much trouble, but I will air out the garage in frequent intervals [via a huge HVAC squirrel cage blower]. However when grinding or cleaning metal, I religiously wear a respirator.
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Offline soundcontrol

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2016 - 05:35:11 pm »
Are you doing any grinding as well? I never found welding to give me much trouble, but I will air out the garage in frequent intervals [via a huge HVAC squirrel cage blower]. However when grinding or cleaning metal, I religiously wear a respirator.


Yeah, I do that a lot, and wire wheel and the scotch type wheel, I do need better protection, have only a paper filter now.
/ Ken
Restoration thread: http://www.cuda-challenger.com/cc/index.php?topic=102525.0
topic=108917.new#new

Offline Cudakiller70

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2016 - 10:36:55 pm »
A welder I worked with who was concerned with health wore a 3m 1/2 face respirator with P100 pink pancake filters while welding and grinding.
This respirator would fit under his welding hood.
From. https://www.solidrop.net/product/3m-6300-2091-half-face-mask-efficient-dust-filter-cotton-respirator-mask-p100-respiratory-protection-lt028.html
The 2091 is commonly used for welding, brazing, torch cutting, metal pouring and soldering. Inventory needs and training requirements of safety equipment are reduced because this filter works for many different applications. This filter is commonly used in the following industries: agriculture, construction, general manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, primary metals. NIOSH approved for environments containing certain oil and non-oil based particles.

3M 6300+2091 Half Face Mask Efficient Dust Filter Cotton Respirator Mask P100 Respiratory Protection LT028
https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/511305O/a-guide-to-understanding-welding-hazards-and-safety-equipment.pdf

Use a general shop fan also, we would use partitions to stop breezes from washing out gas shielding.
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Offline HP2

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2016 - 11:45:35 am »
The fume extractor posted above is a high volume, low velocity unit that cannot be easily duplicated with a house fan which will blow the shielding gas envelop away from the work and create more issues than it will solve. Now if you want a small fan  high up to pull smokey air out of the garage, that is not a bad idea just to help keep the air clear.

Short of  buying a special extractor, I'd second using a respirator. They are inexpensive and effective.

Offline torredcuda

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2016 - 09:43:23 am »
I would suggest using a respirator while welding and using a fan to air out the shop in between as any air movement disturbs the gas "bubble" you need for a clean mig weld. I do agree with Goody though that black junk in you nose is coming from grinding/sanding not welding.
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Offline soundcontrol

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2016 - 09:56:44 am »
I will take your advise guys and buy a really good respirator mask with filters. I just talked to a friend who is a pro welder, he is gonna give me a good proffessional fan for free also. Even if the griding part is worst, the weld fumes can not be good to breathe in, I even read that if you weld on galvanized steel, its creates very toxic fumes (and I did that).

/ Ken
Restoration thread: http://www.cuda-challenger.com/cc/index.php?topic=102525.0
topic=108917.new#new

Offline Cudakiller70

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2016 - 11:57:06 am »
Galvanized isn't crazy bad, be careful of welding on cadmium
http://www.lincolnelectric.com/assets/US/EN/interactive/welding-safety/data/FACT-22.pdf
From page
INTRODUCTION
Fumes are poisonous and can kill.
Overexposure may cause death. Some fume and dust from welding processes (including brazing, soldering, and thermal spraying) may contain cadmium or cadmium oxide compounds. The specific form and con- centration of cadmium present in the fume and dust are dependant on the composition of the filler metal, base metals, metal coatings, atmosphere, flux, and the welding process.
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Offline soundcontrol

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Re: Welding fumes
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2016 - 01:35:53 pm »
Scary stuff, cadmium was used in the galvanizing process up to the 70's, after that it was banned, that means old galvanized pieces are still very bad to weld on.
/ Ken
Restoration thread: http://www.cuda-challenger.com/cc/index.php?topic=102525.0
topic=108917.new#new