Barracuda Challenger Forum

Author Topic: '72 Challenger Project  (Read 3746 times)

Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #45 on: February 21, 2017 - 01:19:31 PM »
Yeah but only after I go through an 80 grit smoothing. Then I guide coat it with 120 and the longest sanding block I can use. The trick is to get the filler as transparent as possible without touching the metal before you guide coat. When I get it really smooth I will spray a thick coat of high build primer to make sure all the waves are out and sand it with 180. With dark colors like I have here I will wet sand it and sight along the wet panels to detect any ripples. This one is going to be HOK Burple.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2017 - 01:21:12 PM by rhamson »




Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #46 on: April 21, 2017 - 11:05:58 AM »
And the long agonizing process continues. I want to get this to a thick coat of build up primer before the end of spring. Then I will move on to mechanical systems before I block and finish paint the whole car. 

Online Beekeeper

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #47 on: April 21, 2017 - 12:33:28 PM »
Fantastic work. Did all this on my other car...it sucks but it pays off in the end.


Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #48 on: April 21, 2017 - 01:39:12 PM »
Thanks, I know you are right.  :faint:
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017 - 08:37:02 AM by rhamson »

Offline jimynick

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #49 on: April 24, 2017 - 11:53:18 PM »
Being a Canuck, I can't comment about Maryland, but here, most any good sized, non Mom and Pop shop has a frame rack and most have a measuring system, too. Google measuring systems and email the manufacture or local distributor and see if you can locate where their gear is. How about a local tech or community college? The normal allowance for setup and measure runs 2.5 hrs and repairs are on top of that, but having said that, it shouldn't run more than $5-600 to fix and it's quick money for the shop, so find another that's properly equipped and good luck!  :cheers:

Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #50 on: April 25, 2017 - 04:04:32 PM »
Being a Canuck, I can't comment about Maryland, but here, most any good sized, non Mom and Pop shop has a frame rack and most have a measuring system, too. Google measuring systems and email the manufacture or local distributor and see if you can locate where their gear is. How about a local tech or community college? The normal allowance for setup and measure runs 2.5 hrs and repairs are on top of that, but having said that, it shouldn't run more than $5-600 to fix and it's quick money for the shop, so find another that's properly equipped and good luck!  :cheers:
I checked around a hundred mile radius and was given the same sad story. Most was that they did not have time, others it was they did not have anyone that knew enough about my car and then there were the I'll call you when I can fit you in. That went on for three months leaving me still with a bent frame. I finally figured out how to measure the car and then how to bend it back using materials I had in my shop. I lived overseas for awhile and knew some Canadians and Brits who were very clever with regards to fixing things most Americans would throw away. The only guys I could find that were interested was the AMD restoration shop in Georgia and a body shop where neither had the ability to bend anything back into shape. I was told you cannot fix a unibody. Well excuse me! Literally almost all modern cars on the road are unibody construction.

Offline daaboots

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #51 on: April 25, 2017 - 04:29:35 PM »
Great work!

Offline jimynick

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #52 on: April 25, 2017 - 07:37:12 PM »
I checked around a hundred mile radius and was given the same sad story. Most was that they did not have time, others it was they did not have anyone that knew enough about my car and then there were the I'll call you when I can fit you in. That went on for three months leaving me still with a bent frame. I finally figured out how to measure the car and then how to bend it back using materials I had in my shop. I lived overseas for awhile and knew some Canadians and Brits who were very clever with regards to fixing things most Americans would throw away. The only guys I could find that were interested was the AMD restoration shop in Georgia and a body shop where neither had the ability to bend anything back into shape. I was told you cannot fix a unibody. Well excuse me! Literally almost all modern cars on the road are unibody construction.
You've got that right! I've heard it so many times and my response is "this thing was glued, screwed and welded together by a bunch of guys who're no smarter or able than you and I are" What a PITA for a job that should have taken a couple of hours on a decent rack. You "got 'er done" though and it looks good. Be sure to drive it over to some of those shops when you get it on the road, and take some of those photos of how you did it. They'll $hit their pants when they see those! Nice adaptation and thinking outside the box!  :thumbsup:

Offline 73440

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #53 on: April 25, 2017 - 08:58:45 PM »
Good work on that frame straightening .
Is that a Stabila level ?
67 440
73 Barracuda w/ 68 440
65 Plymouth Fury III , I sold ,was my Nana's car till 92 yo.
51 Ford F1 239 Flathead, flipped , new cab , stolen
59 BelAir 283 4 door original patina
01 Chevy van 372,894 miles
06 Crown Vic Police Interceptor
75 HD Ironhead converted to RH shift
73 HD Ironhead
82 HD Ironhead
74 Norton 850
80 HD Shovelhead
80 Husqvarna WR 390

Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #54 on: April 25, 2017 - 09:54:02 PM »
You've got that right! I've heard it so many times and my response is "this thing was glued, screwed and welded together by a bunch of guys who're no smarter or able than you and I are" What a PITA for a job that should have taken a couple of hours on a decent rack. You "got 'er done" though and it looks good. Be sure to drive it over to some of those shops when you get it on the road, and take some of those photos of how you did it. They'll $hit their pants when they see those! Nice adaptation and thinking outside the box!  :thumbsup:
Thanks. It always goes this way. To have something nice it seems I have to do it myself.

Offline rhamson

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Re: '72 Challenger Project
« Reply #55 on: April 25, 2017 - 09:58:43 PM »
Good work on that frame straightening .
Is that a Stabila level ?
You guessed it. It's a a 6 foot level I use to set cabinets and doors. I used it to gauge the frame extensions.  I set the leveling table with a laser level. This is always as it goes. I have to make things work.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017 - 08:39:12 AM by rhamson »